Select Page
Practical Guide 21:  Project Execution Planning (PEP)

Practical Guide 21: Project Execution Planning (PEP)

PEP

 

According to Independent Project Analysis (IPA) Project Execution Planning (PEP) is the process of defining the approach that will be followed in executing a capital project.  The Project Execution Plan is the master document that contains all of the necessary information in this regard.   The PEP answers basic questions such as:

  • Who will participate, when will they participate and what roles will they have?
  • How will the project be contracted, sequenced, managed and controlled?
  • When will stage transitions and specific activities take place?
  • What monitoring, control and governance criteria need to be applied?
  • Are there any extraordinary initiatives that may be required which need to be planned and budgeted for?

This practical guide covers the preparation of a typical PEP.  The guide is accompanied by several templates and supporting guides that assist in preparing a PEP from scratch.

Here’s what is covered:

  1. Background, overview and project scope
  2. Framing the project
  3. Planning implementation
  4. Monitor and controlling the plans
  5. Supporting plans
  6. Support services
  7. Governance
  8. The PEP Development Cycle through front-end loading (FEL)

These resources are now available to all toolkit members from the OTC Toolkits Membership site.  (A valid subscription is required).

See you inside the Toolkits.

– The OTC Toolkits Team

Master Class 4:  Owner Team Core Competencies

Master Class 4: Owner Team Core Competencies

MasterClass4

 

In this interesting master class Herman van Heerden discusses the core competencies necessary for an owner team with Freek van Heerden and Kevin Mattheys.

You will learn:

  • The origins of  the “owner team” which came about as owners lost certain in-house competencies in favor of total outsourcing of projects
  • The importance of good leadership in the owner team (sponsor)
  • The importance of understanding the real business need and staying aligned to this through the project
  • Why scope development is so important and why changes need to be controlled and well communicated
  • How to select the people on the owner team who are the owners’ representatives and independent of the engineering or managing contractor
  • The importance of communication and alignment throughout each stage of the project
  • The most important role of the contractor on a project
  • How risk should be distributed between the owner and the contractor.
  • How to determine which specific competencies can and should be outsourced
  • How to implement appropriate governance between the owner and the contractor,  and make sure owner team representatives are properly mandated for their important role

This MasterClass is now available to all toolkit members from the OTC Toolkits Membership site.  (Log-in required).

See you inside the Toolkits.

– The OTC Toolkits Team

Practical Guide 20:  Introduction to Project Management

Practical Guide 20: Introduction to Project Management

Project Management Course

 

Professionals that are new to the project environment will find this practical guide useful in understanding the basics of project management, the stage gate process, team effectiveness and the key roles on the project.   This is an excellent place to start if you have just been asked to participate on a project.

This guide covers an introduction to project management and the stage-gate process.  The guide is accompanied by a multimedia training course. The guide and training can easily be completed in one hour.

Here’s what you will learn:

  1. The project management process and the stage-gate methodology
  2. The PMI project management knowledge areas
  3. Roles on a project
  4. Lessons that will save you time and money

This Guide is now available to all toolkit members from the OTC Toolkits Membership site.  (Log-in required).

See you inside the Toolkits.

– The OTC Toolkits Team

Practical Guide 19:  Industrial Business Systems and IT

Practical Guide 19: Industrial Business Systems and IT

industrial-business-systems-and-it

 

Owners investing in industrial facilities make these investments with the expectation that the venture will generate a good return for the shareholders. To do this the plant will ultimately need to operate as planned with all of the necessary systems for a modern operating business in place and working. 

Ensuring that the right systems are in place for full scale industrial operation is ultimately a business responsibility.  If the various interfaces are not clear between the business and project teams, there is a real risk of surprises later on in the project when the business systems are found to be inadequate, or do not integrate to the plant systems, or when significant costs have not been adequately provided for in the relevant budgets. 

Implementing a new business system as part of a mega-project can be a complex undertaking involving stakeholders in the enterprise that don’t form part of the core project team.  These projects often have different timelines, different project methodologies and different reporting criteria.  Integrating IT and business systems projects with the capital project requires careful attention to the integration between the various project activities.

In addition to this, the main capital project itself needs systems to control costs, schedule and scope of work being done.  These systems involve multiple players including the owner, contractors, EPC contractor and so on.

In this overview practical guide we introduce a number of high level frameworks that will support the various activities that will be undertaken to implement a new business system.   Because this is a vast area there will be a series of practical guides that build on these concepts.

Here’s what you will learn:

  1. The difference between the project life-cycle,  the enterprise life-cycle and software life-cycle
  2. The importance of a program and portfolio approach to running several related IT projects serving the overall business
  3. How business needs are identified that result in new IT projects that interface with the main project
  4. The importance of a common enterprise architecture for business systems, project systems and plant systems
  5. A typical business systems life-cycle
  6. A generic model for business systems in an industrial context
  7. A typical suite of systems to support the main project

This Guide is now available to all toolkit members from the OTC Toolkits Membership site.  (Log-in required).

See you inside the Toolkits.

– The OTC Toolkits Team

Practical Guide 18:  Owner Team Core Competencies

Practical Guide 18: Owner Team Core Competencies

Practical Guide OTCC

How do you put together the owner team for a project?  What roles need to be in place?  What competencies must be represented on the owner team,  and what competencies can be outsourced to a contractor?

In our experience, owner teams are often uncertain of the exact role they should play on a project versus that of the contracted execution partners. As a result, project delivery can be inconsistent and efforts are duplicated with the associated added costs. Furthermore, projects do not always meet the intended business objectives when the assurance mentioned above is not provided by a competent owner team. If the interface between the owner and contractors is poorly coordinated it generally leads to frustration, increased costs and wasted time, supporting departments continue to operate in silos and project related problems quickly escalate and ripple through the organisation. In addition, unexpected project changes can disrupt the business, governance between the owner and contractors is sometimes weak and risks are poorly managed.

The answer lies in establishing a clear process to define, classify and allocate core competencies at the start of a project, and to update this allocation throughout the project life-cycle as different roles come on board.  This practical guide covers the definition and nature of owner core competencies, the composition of owner teams and their contracting relationships.  The guide also covers the selection, classification and allocation of core competencies between team members, other participants and contractors.

Here’s what you will learn:

  1. How to identify project specific owner team core competencies
  2. How to align these competencies with other participant roles
  3. How the core competencies change as the project moves through the stage-gate process
  4. How to allocate competencies between the owner and contractors
  5. How to allocate competencies between owner entities and participants in the project

This Guide is now available to all toolkit members from the OTC Toolkits Membership site.  (Log-in required).

See you inside the Toolkits.

– The OTC Toolkits Team

Practical Guide 17:  Generally accepted scheduling principles (GASP)

Practical Guide 17: Generally accepted scheduling principles (GASP)

GASP

Why is it that soon after the project kicks off, things seem to drift off plan and the project schedule needs to be replaced and re-baselined?

The answer lies in aligning the schedule to best practice.  This practical guide covers a method of analysing a project schedule in terms of generally accepted scheduling principles (GASP).   The resulting analysis can be used to monitor existing project schedules and detect problems early,  or in a tender situation to guide the contractor on the owners requirement in terms of schedule quality.    The analysis measures a schedule in terms of the eight essential principles developed by the Defence Contract Management Agency.   The analysis results in a graphical representation of the schedule quality during the planning and execution stages of any project.

Here’s what you will learn:

  1. What are the generally accepted scheduling principles?
  2. The 14 assessment points
  3. How to analyse a project schedule for alignment to GASP
  4. How to track a project schedule to detect trends early enough to take proactive measures
  5. How an owner can use GASP to improve the quality of the plans of sub-contractors during the tender process and during the project itself.

This Guide is now available to all members and you can access your e-learning from the OTC Toolkits Membership site.  (Log-in required).

See you inside the Toolkits.

– The OTC Toolkits Team